The Ten Essentials

7. Sun Protection: sun screen, sunglasses, and appropriate clothing – AVOID SUNBURN, SNOW BLINDNESS, AND SKIN CANCER

Overview

The Greyrock Trail is a National Recreation Trail

Trail Map

Wilderness
One Way Length
Beginning Elevation
Peak Elevation
Gain/Loss/Net Gain
Rating
USFS Regulations
Trails Illustrated
Quadrangle
None
3.1 miles (trailhead to summit)
5,574
7,613
2,043/4/+2,039
Hikers – Moderate;      Stock prohibited
National Forest & Special Regulations
#101 Cache La Poudre, Big Thompson
Poudre Park

Greyrock Meadows Trail #947

Wilderness
One Way Length

Beginning Elevation
Peak Elevation
Gain/Loss/Net Gain

Rating
USFS Regulations
Trails Illustrated
Quadrangle
None
2.6 miles (lower jct. with Greyrock Trail to upper jct.
with Greyrock Trail)
5,889
7,056
1,531/455/+1,076
Hikers – Moderate;      Stock prohibited
National Forest & Special Regulations
#101 Cache La Poudre, Big Thompson
Poudre Park

Location

Poudre Canyon, 8.4 miles from Ted’s Place. The parking lot is on the south (left) and slightly above the highway. Walk down the steps and across the highway, and cross a foot bridge over the river to the trailhead. Facilities are at parking lot.

GPS Coordinates
Trailhead (at kiosk)
Jct. Greyrock & lower Meadows Trail jct.
Jct. summit, Greyrock &
Meadows Trail (upper end)
Summit

N40°41.716’ W105°17.109’ Open lightbox
N40°41.753’ W105°17.741’

N40°42.709’ W105°17.673’
N40°42.949’ W105°17.561’
Greyrock Trail elevation profile

Description

The Greyrock trails have a number of special regulations, reflecting their very heavy use. All camping and wood-burning fires are prohibited within 200 feet of any water, or of the trail. All mechanized and motorized vehicles are prohibited, including bikes. All dogs must be on hand-held leash. All stock (including horses) are prohibited.

Caution: The lower portions of the Greyrock Trail are lined with poison ivy. See the sign at the trailhead for identification and treatment. The poison ivy makes this a good trail on which to not pet dogs!

Greyrock Trail (#946) is a National Recreation Trail. It was built in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). President Roosevelt created the CCC during the Great Depression. Its mission was to recruit unemployed young men into a peacetime army to work on enhancing forest and recreational resources.

Hike west approximately 0.5 mile. Just after crossing a small stream the trail branches. From here you can hike either the Greyrock Trail or the Greyrock Meadows Trail to the Summit Trail. Both trails are rocky, with frequent steep ascents and descents. If you choose the Greyrock Trail stay to your right and head up a steep incline to the north for approximately 1.6 miles to a flat meadow area. The meadow lies to the south beneath Greyrock. This is a social gathering area, and a camping destination for some hikers. From this location you can scramble up Greyrock Mountain, via the summit trail, which covers the final 0.94 mile. The view from the top of Greyrock is worth the hike. The plains stretch to the northeast as far as you can see, and the mountains are visible in most directions. On your return trip head west along the Greyrock Meadows Trail. This route will cover another 3.5 miles before you return to the parking lot at the trailhead. The Greyrock Meadows Trail will offer great views of Hewlett Gulch and the Snowy Range to the northwest.

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  • Guest - Dusty Robinson

    I hiked the first mile or so of the Grey Rock Trail with my family about one week ago. I was really bummer to see the amount of dog poop on and next to the trail. We have three little girls and it got so bad in spots that we just carried them so they wouldn't step in any. In the first 100 yards there must have been more than 50 different piles on and next to the trail. I am not sure what can be done about it, but just thought I would give someone a heads up.

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  • From a recent Greyrock trail report: "There was a fire ring at about 2.75 miles from the trailhead that still had hot embers in it and we were unable to remove it because of safety."

    Seriously!? After what we have been through the past two years, we haven't learned this lesson yet? Sigh...

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